Alternative Income: GPT Sites

by Andy Hough on April 20, 2007

Using GPT(get-paid-to) sites is another way I make alternative income. The basic idea of GPT sites is that companies pay affiliates to get them customers. The affiliates bribe the customers by offering them some of this money for signing up for offers.

As an example, I signed up for a one month trial of Netflix. I paid $9.99 for the month but the GPT site paid me $23 leaving me with about $13 profit. The company hopes that enough people remain customers after the trial that the company makes a profit.

I haven’t done too many of these lately because it is somewhat of a hassle to call up the companies and cancel and make sure you keep track of when you need to cancel. My favorite GPT site is CashDuck (referral link) which is operated by fellow PF blogger Kira of PennyFoolish. She has a great guide on her site on how to make money on GPT sites. She made thousands from these sites before starting her own.

Other sites I have used are MaviShare (ref link) and InstantProfitz(ref link). MaviShare used to be good but they haven’t had many offers lately. InstantProfitz has lots of offers but it can sometimes be difficult to be properly credited. The only GPT site that I’ve had a bad experience with is DealBarbiePays. There are lots of other sites out there that I haven’t tried that might or might not be good.

If you would like to start doing GPT offers I would recommend first reading the how-to at PennyFoolish and then signing up with CashDuck(ref link). Do one or two offers at first and make sure they are properly crediting. If there are no problems with crediting then go ahead and do as many as you want. This can be a way to make decent money for those who put the time into it.

{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Lulu April 20, 2007 at 10:35 am

I use these sites too. Cash Duck was my first experience and then I went to DealBarbie and I do agree that CashDuck is a WHOLE lot easier to use. I have also tried Treasure Trooper but they are a bit like DB where the offers are hard to understand and some do not credit. So I say a big thumbs up to CashDuck.

2 Wil April 20, 2007 at 7:45 pm

If people are signing up for these trials knowing that they’re going to cancel so they can make a profit from the GPT sign-up deal, isn’t that unethical? Not to mention all the cookie-deleting and multiple credit card numbers and email accounts as discussed in that PennyFoolish guide?

I’m all for making money online, and we all have to decide for ourselves what he feel comfortable doing, but this seems a bit shady to me.

3 Tight Fisted Miser April 21, 2007 at 10:43 am

Wil- The companies know that these trials are being done through GPT sites. They hope that even though many people are signing up just to make a profit enough of them will remain customers to make the trial deal payoff. It isn’t unethical, the companies know and expect this type of behavior. It is similar to the 0% credit card arbitrage, the companies know many people will use them to make money but enough people will keep balances after the 0% rate expires that the credit card company will make money too.

The tips at the PennyFoolish guide are to prevent erroneous charges and spam. She isn’t suggesting you sign up for the same offer multiple times or otherwise try to defraud the company.

There are plenty of GPT sites like this. If the advertisers didn’t think it was a good deal all they would have to do is not allow their ads on GPT sites. Many companies don’t allow their ads to be on GPT sites.

4 Wil April 21, 2007 at 11:25 pm

Yes, I understand that the companies involved know this sort of thing is going on, and they no doubt do the numbers and work out how much money they can afford to lose per new customer acquisition, etc. I also know that some of the companies that offer these trials aren’t above a little shady/unethical stuff themselves, offering deceptive deals, lots of fine print, and plenty of hoops to jump through when you’re trying to cancel your trial before it turns into something that’s going to cost you a significant amount of money.

But I still don’t think this a good way to make money online. As I said, it just seems a bit shady to me. I guess the question I would ask myself is, “What am I providing in return for the money I’m being given?” or “What value am I creating?” Getting paid to sign up for things that I have no interest in, taking money from companies I have no intention of doing business with, just seems parasitic.

5 jeremy February 12, 2009 at 10:13 pm

i work paid the fastest had plenty of good luck with the site. im also planning on starting my own gpt site up and was looking to see if someone wanted to partner with me split the cost 50/50 and the profits 50/50 im a former national guards soldier with the 110th mt division in ny and was injured in tikrit in 2005 i had tendon and nerve damage done to my right hand and live off disability which is only 300 a month. so i wanted to start a gpt site up. i talk to alot of owners paid the fastest bowling for cash and a girl who owns a downlinedoubler.com so i know how to find the adds to promote just need someone to set up the site and do the security for it ill be on the site for most of the day seeing i do advertising and marketing on here as it is. so if anyone wants to go in with me let me know please my aim is jerjerbear72784 and im serious in starting a gpt site thanks

jeremy

6 EBAYS GONNA GET YOU August 1, 2011 at 1:47 pm

You keep ripping people off….your gonna get yours…

****This comment has been edited due to content. If you have a problem with the commenter you should talk to him directly. This blog isn’t the proper forum for your complaint.***

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: